Ice in the River Wear, January 1984

During the winter of 1983-84, there was a very snowy cold spell in the last week of January 1984. Scotland, Northern Ireland and the North of England were affected.

Here’s a nice couple of black and white photos of the Fulling Mill and Cathedral taken by Craig Oliphant, who has very kindly given his permission to publish. Ice is just starting to form in the still water above the weir.

The Bonacina/O’Hara snowfall analysis says

“Jan, very snowy in Scotland. 13th-23rd Jan., Scotland, N. Ireland and northern England. Considerable drifting on hills. 21-23rd Jan., northern England, C. Highlands, Scotland 2ft lying. Early Feb, Scotland. 24th Mar., Highlands.”

Amazing sunrise from Wharton Park 8th December 2019

Some amazing shots this morning of the sunrise from Wharton Park, with Durham Cathedral silhouetted against the fiery skyline. The day soon turned into a blustery one with showers and gusty westerly winds.

Pictures here are courtesy of Kevin Edworthy. Many thanks Kevin for allowing me to use these.

sunrise photo from wharton park durham with durham cathedral silhouetted against the red clouds 1
sunrise photo from wharton park durham with durham cathedral silhouetted against the red clouds 1
sunrise photo from wharton park durham with durham cathedral silhouetted against the red clouds 2
sunrise photo from wharton park durham with durham cathedral silhouetted against the red clouds 2
sunrise photo from wharton park durham with durham cathedral silhouetted against the red clouds 3
sunrise photo from wharton park durham with durham cathedral silhouetted against the red clouds 3
sunrise photo from wharton park durham with durham cathedral silhouetted against the red clouds 4
sunrise photo from wharton park durham with durham cathedral silhouetted against the red clouds 4

More autumn colours in Durham, back in GMT again

The first day after the clocks returned to GMT was glorious early on, with bright cold conditions. Another walk by the riverbank shows the autumnal colours.

picture of a tree silhouetted against the background taken from pelaw wood
Majestic tree silhouetted in the bright morning sun.
picture of a panaromic view across the river wear from pelaw wood
Panoramic view from Pelaw Wood

 

Path through Pelaw Wood
Wildlife on the river

Durham Cathedral

A cracking Spring day in May 2018. From Prebends Bridge

picture from prebends bridge showing durham cathedral
Durham Cathedral and The River Wear from Prebends Bridge

A gorgeous day in May 2018. View from Prebends Bridge looking towards Framwelgate Bridge. It was the precursor of a fantastic summer. The Durham Cathedral tower work continues, still shrouded in it’s protective covering. The stonemasons are replacing weathered stone blocks at the top of the Main Cathedral Tower, as they have become dangerous.

Prebends Bridge washed away in November 1771

 

The previous Prebends Bridge was washed away in a catastrophic flood on 17th November 1771. It was a storm that proved fatal to many North East bridges on both the Tyne and Wear, as well as many smaller tributaries.

Heavy snow in Durham – “The Beast from The East” March 2018

An Easterly outbreak, dubbed “The Beast from The East” by the media, dumped a substantial amount of snow on us at the end of February and early March 2018. When such a weather synoptic occurs, we tend to get plastered in snow here on the North East Coast. Temperatures hover around zero and potent snow showers are readily blown inland, reaching Durham without too much trouble.

Here’s a view across The River Wear from the path just as we emerged from Pelaw Wood. Snow was 8-12” deep in most places, squeaking under our boots as we walked down the track to the river from Silverlink Bridge.

Met Office : Snow and Low temperatures February to March 2018

See the 2nd March report from The Durham Magazine, “Durham Battles to keep moving as the Beast from The East Ravages the County”

Nacreous Clouds over Durham, Feb 2016

A fantastic display of nacreous (mother of pearl) clouds occured across NE England in February 2016. These photos were taken above Durham Cathedral and Castle at about 7:15am.

Nacreous Clouds are quite rare. They can glow very brightly due to iridescence and are much higher than other tropospheric clouds, a height of 15-30km above the ground is typical. They are caused by wave-like motion of air, normally due to the proximity of mountain ranges. Best viewing is just before dawn and just after sunset.

Durham Cathedral Sunset September 2005

durhamcathedralsunset

This was one of my favourite weather photos from Durham City. It was taken on the way up the steps into the Durham University Students Union building (Dunelm House) in New Elvet. The sun was going down behind Durham Cathedral.

That was the last I saw of the sun that night as I disappeared into The Durham Beer Festival being held at Dunelm House.