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Category: Ice and Snow

Skating on the River Wear in December 1895

This photo was posted to Facebook recently, taken (we think) in December 1895. It shows people sweeping the ice on the river, perhaps preparing it for skating or maybe a curling competition. The location is just below Prebends Bridge.

December 1895 was one of the coldest Decembers ever recorded in Durham.

Noticeable is how little vegetation cloaks the slopes below the Cathedral. The building to the left of the photograph is the Old Fulling Mill.

Prebends Bridge can be seen in this photograph, everyone is skating!

Snowfall from Dipton, near Consett 27th October 2018

Some snow fell on the highest parts of our region yesterday as snow showers peppered the Northern half of the country from the unstable Arctic flow. Dipton, nr Consett saw about 3” of snow. Dipton is about 800ft above sea level. Here’s a couple of photos from GeordieKev, posted to NetWeather Forums. The Consett area is one of the snowiest urban communities in Britain, according to Professor Gordon Manley. My own site in Gilesgate got nothing more than sleety rain.

GeordieKev’s Weather Station is at

http://www.wunderground.com/q/locid:UKXX5585

picture of Snowfall in Dipton, nr. Consett 27th Oct 2018
Snowfall in Dipton, nr. Consett 27th Oct 2018
picture of Snowfall in Dipton, nr. Consett 27th Oct 2018
Snowfall in Dipton, nr. Consett 27th Oct 2018

First Ground Frost of Autumn – October 18th 2018

picture of frost glistening on the grass
Frost on the grass

The first ground frost of Autumn was evident this morning. Frost could be seen on cars and on the grass when I went out about 8am. The air temperature was still well above freezing though, bottoming out around 3.5 degC. This shows how the temperature at ground level can be much lower on clear nights, when the dew point is depressed in slightly drier air.

picture of the netatmo app showing minimum temperature
Air temperature reached a low of 3.5 degC in Gilesgate, Durham

The day then turned out to be superbly sunny and quite mild. A classic Autumn day!

 

A summary of Winter 1946-47

January 1947. Cold (2.2C CET), but not excessively so overall. The month is most memorable for the start of a severe, prolonged, and exceptionally snowy cold spell. Although there had been some significant snowfalls in December, and again on the 4-5th, the harsh winter did not really get going until the third week, after quite a mild interlude (hence the average). After some early cold snaps, there was a very pleasant, mild interlude. The first five days were mild and wet, with a heavy snow fall early on the 6th and snow lying on the ground until the 9th. It then turned very mild with westerly winds from the 14th to 18th.

It reached 14C in places on the 16th; Saturday 18 January was sunny and mild, and then … The severe winter really started on the 20th January, with the first frost since the 7th. On the 22nd, a NE airflow brought cold air all the way from Siberia. There were frequent snow showers on the 22nd and 23rd. On the 26th much of England experienced continual frost. There was a major blizzard in the southwest on the 28th. There was a minimum of -21C early on the 29th at Writtle (Essex), and then a maximum of -5C over much of eastern England. There was 17cms of snow on the Isles of Scilly on the 30th.

Low pressure over the UK on 3 February 1947

February 1947. The coldest February ever recorded (-1.9C CET), the second coldest month of the century (after January 1963), and the coldest month overall since January 1814. Many places in England were beneath freezing from the 11th to the 23rd; Greenwich registered 14 consecutive days beneath zero. At Oxford frost began at 6 pm on the 10th and continued until 6 am on the 26th. The record low average was mainly determined by the very low maxima. Low minima were not outstanding because of the extensive cloud cover, until clearer skies at the end of the month, when -21C was recorded at Wolburn on the 25th.

It was a persistent easterly month of the sort that weather people long for: large amounts of snow in the east (e.g. 1.35 m of snow lay at Forrest-in-Teesdale (Durham) on the 18th. It was also very dull. There was no sunshine at Kew at all from the 2-22nd inclusive, and only 17 hours of sunshine in total (compared with the average of 61). A side-effect of the easterlies was that the Scottish Highlands had no rain at all this month, for the first time in recorded history, where it was also very sunny. It was, of course, also snowy, with snowstorms particularly affecting the south, midlands, and east. There was a major snowstorm on the 25-26th. It was also quite a windy month. Buxton had 30 consecutive days of frost. At Kew the maximum temperature of the month was 5C. Hence I vote this to be the most interesting February of the century.

March 1947. The severe winter continued into the first half of the month. There were some very low temperatures -21.1C at Haughall, Durham, Peebles, and Braemar, on the 4th; widespread flooding after a rapid thaw of the famous winter; ice storms, blizzards, heavy rainfall, and on average the wettest March on record (177mm , which was 300% of average). Heavy snowfall over England and Wales on the 4th and 5th, including several cms in the London area, caused more disruption. There were more readings of -20C on the 8th, including -21.1C at Braemar. Much of the country was covered in snow for the first part of the month, with drifts up to 5 m deep on the Pennines, and even up to 3 m at Whipsnade on the 9th.

Warm air and heavy rain started to move in on the 10th March. This led at first to a great snowstorm in Scotland on the 12-13th. 85 kn wind was recorded at Mildenhall, and a mean windspeed of 38 kn at Edgbaston, both in a severe SW gale on the 16th that affected south Wales and the south of England in one of the worst March storms of recent times. Flooding was particularly severe in the east, particularly the Fen country. More heavy sleet in Sussex on the 28th, as temperatures fell again at the end of the month. It was the coldest month of the century in Scotland, and the wettest of the century in England and Wales (177.5 mm, 292% – the highest percentage, too). Clearly this must be the most interesting March for weather of the century!

https://www.trevorharley.com/weather_web_pages/britweather.htm

Heavy snow in Durham – “The Beast from The East” March 2018

An Easterly outbreak, dubbed “The Beast from The East” by the media, dumped a substantial amount of snow on us at the end of February and early March 2018. When such a weather synoptic occurs, we tend to get plastered in snow here on the North East Coast. Temperatures hover around zero and potent snow showers are readily blown inland, reaching Durham without too much trouble.

Here’s a view across The River Wear from the path just as we emerged from Pelaw Wood. Snow was 8-12” deep in most places, squeaking under our boots as we walked down the track to the river from Silverlink Bridge.

See the 2nd March report from The Durham Magazine, “Durham Battles to keep moving as the Beast from The East Ravages the County”

Durham Weather on the road – Iceland trip 2017

Durham Weather went on the road in March 2017 for a trip to Iceland. The highlight of the trip was the Golden Circle drive up to Gullfoss waterfall. Not surprisingly, it was incredibly cold!

We also visited Geysir where hot springs and bubbling mud pools are regularly interrupted by the erupting Guysers.

Iceland is an incredible place for anyone interested in how Planet Earth works. It’s highly recommended for a visit, but it’s a bit expensive. 😏

Website created by D.K. O'Hara Copyright 2018.

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